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MYSTERY OF BABYLON Ė Volume 1, Chapt. 1

Our father, Ronald William Moulden, was born January 3rd, 1920 (1-3-1930) in Montreal, Quebec, Canada to proud parents William Jeffrey Moulden and Helen Middleton. Our fatherís caring generous nature was present throughout his life. It is no surprise then that this gentle man passed away peacefully, surrounded by a caring family, who exuded nurturance and love in the same giving spirit as this temperate man has modeled throughout his life. Our father was always willing to give of himself to help his family, and others, navigate the trials and tribulations of life. When his own mother succumbed to Cancer in her late 40í, there was no Home Care available in that era. Ron was in his 20ís. Rather than tend to his own youthful adventures, our father chose to remain home and tend to his family. He and his father worked shift work. One would work days, the other nights, so someone could be with his mother 24 hours a day

Our father was always willing to give of himself to help his family, and others, navigate the trials and tribulations of life. When his own mother succumbed to Cancer in her late 40í, there was no Home Care available in that era. Ron was in his 20ís. Rather than tend to his own youthful adventures, our father chose to remain home and tend to his family. He and his father worked shift work. One would work days, the other nights, so someone could be with his mother 24 hours a day.

Dadís first job was receiving flying lessons at age 18. He was involved with Noorduyn Aviation during WWII building planes including the Harvard trainer and The Norseman which is still used in Northern Canada today. Dad then went into the automobile industry as a service/sales manager for Bud and Dyer. Their focus was on imported vehicles such as Bentley, Jacquar, and Peugeot. Our fatherís pride in his youth was his Jaguar, a car that he has retained affinity for all his life. His interests extended to mechanical things including automobiles, planes, and motorcycles. He participated successfully in various automobile races and motor cycle hill climbs in his 20ís to 30's..

Ron worked for Brunswick Canada as the Maritimes Sales Rep, and resided in Moncton, New Brunswick from 1963-66 after marrying mom in 1959. He returned to Montreal briefly. Our young family then relocated to North Bay for 27 years. In North Bay Dad worked for London Life, an overhead door business, then retired at age 65 after working as an owner-operator in the Courier industry. He then moved to Guelph for 2 years, Kitchener for 8 years, and most recently Wiarton in the months preceding his becoming ill.


My Father's hobbies included family life, wood-working, boating, camping, fishing, traveling, reading novels, automobile racing was a sport he enthusiastically followed, and cars. His aptitudes were mechanical. There was nothing that his hands could not fix, take apart, build, or create. He retained a fascination with the aviation industry. In retirement he had the opportunity to fly in a glider in Guelph. It was heart-warming to see the enthusiastic glee, and adventurous, indomitable spirit of a young man captured on our fatherís face this past summer in Wiarton when my sister and brother-in-law were able to

Dr Andrew (Ahmad) Moulden MA .MD, PhD A Sonís Tribute honouring his Father's get Dad a flight in a Harvard Trainer (Picture). Dad helped build these planes during the second World War. The pilots were so impressed with Dadís knowledge of their plane and hobby that they invited him to come and speak to them as a group.

In todayís era, people tend to measure a manís value by success in life as indexed by achievement, financial wealth, social status, power, popularity, and possessions. Although our father did not amass huge credits on these indices, as a family, we are unanimous in our wholehearted recognition that Ron Mouldenís value was immeasurable on such superficial scales. Kindness, soft-spoken, gentleness, affection, humor, dedication, commitment, modesty, generosity, warmth, integrity, a youthful spirit, and a love for chatting with people. He did not raise his hand to his family. Foul words were foreign to his tongue. He followed through on commitments. He was conscientious. His heart was pure, and everyone he met immediately knew this. He worked hard. He was reliable. He was faithful. Our parents had a hugging corner in our kitchen which was well used. Mom and Dad expressed their affection openly in our family, it was fun trying to squeeze between them in the hugging corner as a child in order to join in on the affection, and make them giggle. Dad struggled along with our mother to make ends meet and always, and we mean always in every sense of the word, he put the needs of his wife and children, and in recent years, grandchild, before his own.

One Christmas in our youth, when times were tough, our parents purchased Christmas presents for my sister and I, as well as for themselves. Unable to afford such a giving spirit this Christmas, and unbeknownst to my sister and I, our parents returned their own Christmas presents on boxing day. Our parents wanted their children to feel the joy of Christmas even though they could not afford to give to each other. They sheltered us from their worries, sacrificed their own pleasures, and put my sister and I in the forefront of their life. It was a divine gift to be blessed with such caring parents. Even the minutia of our happiness as children was worked out to the finest detail. Dad would place newspaper on the floor between the fireplace and the Christmas tree, sure enough, with out fail, there would be footprints out of ashes on the newspaper in the am when my sister and I arose from bed Ė evidence that Santa Claus had been to our house During our teens, rather than send us to public school, our parents hoped that our educational needs might best be served in the private school sector. Our parents elected to foot the bill for this opportunity. Although high school was a blur for myself, and no walk in the park for my sister, many of the dreams our parents had for us have come to fruition. We are pleased our father was long-lived with quality of life, and


During our teens, rather than send us to public school, our parents hoped that our educational needs might best be served in the private school sector. Our parents elected to foot the bill for this opportunity. Although high school was a blur for myself, and no walk in the park for my sister, many of the dreams our parents had for us have come to fruition. We are pleased our father was long-lived with quality of life, and Dr Andrew (Ahmad) Moulden MA .MD, PhD A Sonís Tribute honoring his Father's able to enjoy and appreciate the rewards of the labors of his love for our mother and for his children. For myself, much to my fatherís surprise and pleasure, academia and clinical medicine has taken center stage. Dad was always interested in hearing the details of the latest research project I was involved in. He would always ask about the details of my Ph.D. thesis, or raise interesting medical questions. I would always ask about cars, car repairs, and directions on how to get to various places

Dad was as mystified as I was with the aliya I experienced while watching the elderly residents at the Benand Hilda Katz/Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care eat breakfast one spring morning in 1996.


My PhD training in neurophysiology at the Rotman Research Institute of the Baycrest hospital impressed upon me the warmth, bonded spirituality, kindness, gentleness, and concern for humanity that Judaism seems to embody. There is a Unity to the Jewish people that reminded me of the unity I felt with my father Ė we all share similar values and have tried to project these onto the World around us. I would not fully comprehend the significance of my time at the Baycrest until October, 2004. It was impressive to observe the local youth of the Jewish community around the Baycrest Centre in North York, Ontario come and visit the lonely elderly patients on the weekend. What humanity! I have been in many hospitals and never have I witnessed such youthful altruism. I recall remarking to my father, ďno wonder the Jewish people have received so many Nobel prizes, they care for themselves, and each other. This is the motivation and Ron Moulden passed on to us. If only the rest of the world cared for their fellow man this way, what a better place the world would be.


Our dad was an encyclopaedia of car facts as well as route-taking directions. He could have written a book entitled ďThe Best way to drive from here to thereĒ, with landmarks, scenic vistas, time-saving short-cuts, points of interest, and things to avoid. For each route there would have been annotated footnotes on three other ways to arrive at the same destination factoring in the time of day, seasonality, road conditions, global warming, and quite possibly migration patterns of the Canadian Goose. While we both listened intently and shared a mutual admiration for each otherís verbose offerings, I think we confused each other more times than not. Neither one of us had the heart to admit it. We will all miss asking dad for directions, on the road, how to fix things, what is wrong with our car, and with life.

For my sister, 'Meralie', parenthood and family-life has taken front stage. Ron was tickled pink by the addition of his grandson Jesse to our family. Jesseí name derives from our grandmother, Oliveís mother, Jessie Andrews (nee Sclater). Jessie Andrews adored Ron and actively encouraged Oliveís dating and marrying such an upstanding young man. Jessie Andrews certainly was never disappointed by this endorsement and neither was mom, and neither were we as his children. Jessie Andrews passed away on my birthday, November 12th, 1988. Not surprisingly, Ron was intimately involved in her care as Jessie
 

... to be continued